The Genetic Lottery: Sickle Cell Anaemia and Me

by Tamilore Awosile, Year 13, The Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys’ School, Hertfordshire. I was born with sickle cell anaemia, a genetically inherited blood disorder which affects approximately 4.4 million people worldwide. In the UK, it is particularly prevalent in people of African or Caribbean heritage. Sickle cell is caused by a mutation in the DNA of…

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The Point of Pencils?

by Ashley Kabue, Year 12, Bablake School, West Midlands. Often viewed as a mundane writing utensil used primarily by young children and artists, pencils are a highly underappreciated tool. For hundreds of years, they have enabled students and scientists alike to record discoveries, quickly note their observations, and most importantly, erase their mistakes. However, they…

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Google Maps and the Atomic Clock

by Emily Pentil, Year 11, Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School, Buckinghamshire. In 1957, one second was defined as 9,192,631,770 oscillations of the radiation corresponding to the transition between two energy levels of the caesium atom. Physics so esoteric seems unlikely to feature in an essay about the science of everyday life. But the idea of…

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How Science is Involved Even in the Most Basic Products of Everyday Life

by Diyaco Shwany, Year 11, King Ecgbert School, Sheffield. Many people around the world do not know the significance, impacts and importance of science in everyday life. Almost every product we use in our life is developed through the knowledge of scientific discovery that even includes some of the foods we eat. Let’s take a…

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Tic Tock, When Will it Stop?

by Amrutha Vudathu, Year 11, Michaela Community School, Brent. As the lights dimmed, soft mutters around me began to disappear. Dancers dressed in vivid colours rushed onto the brightly lit stage, smiling cheerily. Heads in the audience turned to face away from their conversations to see the stage, when suddenly- ‘Right arm, throw yourself into…

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Vivien T. Thomas: From Poverty to Pioneer

By Emma Baker, Year 13, Queen Elizabeth Sixth Form College, Durham Vivien T. Thomas never had much more than a high school diploma, yet remains one of the most significant pioneers of cardiac surgery to date – having helped save the lives of countless children with congenital heart defects through surgical techniques he invented. His…

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